Jacksonville DUI Arrest Records and Statistics

Nearly 1/2 of drivers killed in crashes that test positive for drugs also test positive for alcohol

Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2011). Monitoring the Future national survey results on drug use, 1975-2011. Volume I: Secondary school students (NIH Publication No. 10-7584). Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 734 pp

In 2010, 10,228 people died in drunk driving crashes. That is one every 52 minutes. In addition 345,000 were injured in crashes caused by DUI.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2011.

Over 1.4 million were arrested in 2010 for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Federal Bureau of Investigation, “Crime in the United States: 2010”

The percentages of drivers involved in fatal crashes with a BAC level of over .08 in 2010 were 28% for motorcycles, 23 percent for cars, and 22 percent for trucks. The percentage of drivers with BAC levels of .08 or higher in fatal crashes was the lowest for large trucks (2%).

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2010: Alcohol Impaired Driving” Washington DC, 2011.

About 1/3 of drivers arrested or convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol are repeat offenders.

Fell, Jim. “Repeat DWI Offenders in the United States.” Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Traffic Tech No. 85, February 1995.

Among those 12 or older, males are more likely than females (15.1 vs. 7.9 percent) to drive under the influence of alcohol.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration “Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings.” September 2011.

The DUI arrest rate is highest among persons aged 21 to 25 (23.4 percent). An estimated 5.8 percent of 16 and 17 year olds and 15.1 percent of 18 to 20 year olds reported driving under the influence of alcohol in the past year. After the age of 25, DUI rates showed declines with age.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. “Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings.” September 2011.

For fatal crashes involving alcohol in 2010, the highest percentage of DWI drivers was ages 21 to 24 (34%), then ages 25 to 34 (30%) and 35 to 44 (25%).

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2010: Alcohol Impaired Driving” Washington DC, 2011.

In 2010, 211 children were killed in drunk driving crashes. Out of those 211 deaths, 131 (62%) were riding with the drunk driver.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2010: Alcohol Impaired Driving” Washington DC, 2011.

In 2010, 16% of all drivers involved in fatal crashes during the week were drunk driving crashes, compared to 31% on weekends.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2010: Alcohol Impaired Driving” Washington DC, 2011.

The rate of alcohol impairment among drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2010 was four times higher at night than during the day (37% versus 9%).

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2010: Alcohol Impaired Driving” Washington DC, 2011.

Adults across the nation drank too much and got behind the wheel about 112 million times in 2010, which is almost 300,000 incidents of drinking and driving each day.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, October 2011

Every day in America, another 28 people die as a result of drunk driving crashes.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2011.

Drunk driving costs the United States $132 billion a year.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration FARS data, 2010

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and about one-third of those are alcohol related.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2008: Young Drivers”. DOT 811 169. Washington DC, 2009

50% to 75% of convicted drunk driving offenders continue to drive on a suspended license.

Peck, R.C., Wilson, R. J., and Sutton, L. 1995. “Driver license strategies for controlling the persistent DUI offender, Strategies for Dealing with the intent Drinking Driver.” Transportation Research Board, Transportation Research Circular No. 437. Washington, D.C. National Research Council: 48-49 and Beck, KH, et al. “Effects of Ignition Interlock License Restrictions on Drivers with Multiple Alcohol Offenses: A Randomized Trial in Maryland.” American Journal of Public Health, 89 vol. 11 (1999): 1696-1700.

On average, one in three people will be involved in a drunk driving crash in their lifetime.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “The Traffic Stop and You: Improving Communications between Citizens and Law Enforcement.”, March 2001, DOT HS 809 212.

One in three people will be involved in an alcohol-related crash in their lifetime.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “The Traffic Stop and You: Improving Communications between Citizens and Law Enforcement.”, March 2001, DOT HS 809 212.

Drunk driving costs each adult in this country almost $500 per year.

(Taylor, et al 2002) Full cite: Taylor, Dexter; Miller, Ted; and Cox, Kenya. “Impaired Driving in the United States Cost Fact Sheets.” Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2002.

An average drunk driver has driven drunk 80 times before first arrest.

(Centers for Disease Control. “Vital Signs: Alcohol-Impaired Driving Among Adults — United States, 2010.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 4, 2011.)

Almost every 90 seconds, a person is injured in a drunk driving crash.

Blincoe, Lawrence, et al. “The Economic Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes 2000.” Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2002. NHTSA FARS data, 2011.

Teen alcohol use kills about 6000 people each year, more than all illegal drugs combined.

(Hingson and Kenkel, 2003) Full citation: Hingson, Ralph and D. Kenkel. “Social and Health Consequences of Underage Drinking.” In press. As quoted in Institute of Medicine National Research Council of the National Academies. Bonnie, Richard J. and Mary Ellen O’Connell, eds. Reducing Underage Drinking: A Collective Responsibility. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2003.

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